Tuesday, August 14, 2012

Act Now on Acne

It's just about time for your teenager to head back to school. You've already taken care of the new school supplies and the new clothes so they can feel comfortable around their classmates while looking their best (and better than last year!). Only this year, something's different. Normally your son or daughter can't wait to show off his/her new gear and get back into the daily routine of being around friends...but not this year. His acne has flared up for the first time.


Of course he's embarrassed. He's searching for the quick fix while worrying about what others will think and say about him. As a parent, don't panic. Often times acne comes through genetics, so there's a good chance you or your spouse had to deal with a similar issue in your teenage years. Acne is also one of the most common skin conditions, so there's an equally good chance there are plenty of other teenagers in his school dealing with the same thing.

Acne occurs when hair follicles become plugged with oil and dead skin cells. It will most commonly appear on the face, neck, chest, back and shoulders. Worst of all, it's annoyingly persistent. Just when you think you've got one area under control, another area tends to pop up.

Here's the good news...effective treatments are available — and the earlier treatment is started, the lower the risk of lasting physical and emotional damage. However, treatment is best handled by a professional. Self medicating (or picking at) acne will increase the chances of lasting, possibly permanent scars.
We treat countless numbers of acne patients each year ranging from men to women and from teenagers to adults. In fact, numbers indicate 85% of all teens will develop acne and 25% of those will have permanent scars. Adults aren't out of the woods either - 20% of adults will see signs of the skin condition.

One of the top keys to effective treatment is unquestionably to start it as early as possible. Don't hesitate to call our office today if you suspect acne is starting to flare up on your teenager's skin or your own.

We're here to help. Call us at (843) 881-4440.